IFT ITRC holds industry briefing on MHRM Project and releases the latest survey findings


DSC00632.JPG
DSC00616.JPG

IFT Tourism Research Centre (ITRC) held an industry briefing on 24 Nov 2017 and released the latest findings on one of the Center’ major research projects - the Macao Human Resource Monitor Survey (MHRM).

 

The MHRM Survey is ITRC’s long-term research that regularly measures job satisfaction levels and other key HR indicators of Macao’s general labor force, with particular focus on those working in the hospitality, gaming and tourism industries. In addition to monitoring general job satisfaction, the survey looks at several key HR variables such as workers’ perceived fairness in compensation and benefits, levels of job stress, and workers’ intent to stay, social well-being and life-work balance, among others. This year, ITRC is announcing the results of two special in-depth studies on the topic of Macao workers’ perception of women as managers as well as the extent of gender bias in organizations.

 

Mr. Patrick Lo, IFT Lecturer and ITRC research staff, presented the latest trends on key HR indicators. The most recent findings show that Macao workers generally feel less satisfied with their jobs, less fairly compensated, have lower willingness to stay, and experience more stress comparing to previous years. The overall job satisfaction score for all workers is 3.38 on a 5-point Likert scale ranged from 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest) in the latest study. IFT Lecturer Dr. Henrique Ngan conducted a study and measured stereotypic attitudes toward women as managers, which employed the Women as Managers Scale (WAMS), and found that the average WAMS score is 4.79 on a 1- to 7-point Likert scale, in which the higher the score, the more positive the attitude towards women as managers. Though the WAMS average score is slightly above the midpoint of scale (of 4), it is lower than average scores found in other studies, particularly those from western countries.

 

Another special focus report on gender bias was carried out by Dr. Louis Vong, Assistant Professor at IFT, the results of which are now published online (together with all the findings released during the briefing). Dr. Vong’s study looked at gender bias and whether or not having a male versus female superior would affect several HR related conditions such as work performance, stress, and job satisfaction.

 

About 30 participants from industry, principally from various HR departments, attended the briefing. For complete online reports, definition of the concepts used in this report, as well as details of the methodology employed as well as respondents’ characteristics, please visit the MHRM page.